crown

CROWN is a kinetic robotic sculpture of five looming three-jointed towers arranged in a ring.

Hydraulic actuators control the movement of the joints to open and close the crown segments in waves.

The towers are covered with laser-cut wood filigree over diffusion film and lit from within by thousands of LEDs.

 
 CROWN rendering by Jake Bjeldanes

CROWN rendering by Jake Bjeldanes

CROWN creates a space for shared experience with its gigantic scale, riotous light show, and impressive kinetic motion. My mission with this robotic piece is mass hypnosis, wonder, and delight.

 

physical description

A colossal robotic sculpture, five prismatic towers stand in a circle and move inwards and outwards via hydraulic mechanisms. Each tower is 30ft tall, of 3 vertical segments, each individually controlled for a total 40 degrees of movement each tower. The structural steel armature is covered with decorative laser-cut wooden panels in a tapered petal shape over diffusion plastic and thousands of LEDs. Lighting effects will move around the structure, inside and between towers, and coordinate with the movement of the towers to make a massive moving canvas. Spotlights at the tip of each tower will translate the movements into the sky for all to see from afar. A square base, 6ft tall, will be made of precision-cut mild steel in the same pattern, with illumination. This will provide the barrier between participants and the machinery that drives the kinetic sculpture. From dusk till dawn, the lights will run on CROWN. During the day, the towers will be frozen in place, a different shape each day. Classical music will play at CROWN all hours of the event.

 CROWN rendering by Jake Bjeldanes

CROWN rendering by Jake Bjeldanes

interactivity

The hydraulic motions are by necessity not fast to respond to input, which means that participants to create a “program” and hit “go” to enact it, then watch the full sequence occur over several minutes. The program may be written by combining a series of RFID embedded objects that encode actions, or by manipulating a scale model "joystick," in which sensors read the position and relay information to the large sculpture.